Elissa Sussman

Author. Nerd. Baker.
elissasussman.com

cognitivedissonance:

BOOM
writingmemes:

When you want to write but also don’t want to write.

So….every single day?

writingmemes:

When you want to write but also don’t want to write.

So….every single day?

(via lorimlee)

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via writingwithcolor)

ifreakinlovebooks:

Christine Heppermann’s brilliant author note from Poisoned Apples.

(via epicreads)

thecutestofthecute:

Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Appreciation Post

(via wilwheaton)

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

N. K. Jemisin is an American speculative fiction writer and blogger. Her 2010 debut novel, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award, the 2011 Hugo Award, and the World Fantasy Award[1] and was ranked #5 on Amazon’s “editors’ pick” list of the year’s best ten works of science fiction and fantasy.[2] Also in 2010, her short story “Non-Zero Probabilities” was a finalist for the Hugo and Nebula Awards.

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

N. K. Jemisin is an American speculative fiction writer and blogger. Her 2010 debut novel, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award, the 2011 Hugo Award, and the World Fantasy Award[1] and was ranked #5 on Amazon’s “editors’ pick” list of the year’s best ten works of science fiction and fantasy.[2] Also in 2010, her short story “Non-Zero Probabilities” was a finalist for the Hugo and Nebula Awards.

(via authorsofcolor)

skunkandburningtires:

James Lopez is a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman) who is trying to raise funding for his primarily hand-drawn short film, Hullabaloo, with hopes of eventually finding a studio to fund a full-length version.

From the film’s IndieGo page:

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

In addition to helping save 2D animation, Hullabaloo aims to encourage girls to explore science and adventure. The film’s two protagonists are both young women and both scientists who use their intellect, wits, and courage to fight greed and corruption. We hope that Veronica Daring and her friend Jules will serve as positive role models for girls of all ages and encourage them to get excited about science, engineering, and sci-fi.

To see some footage and a short video pitch from Lopez, click here.

Um. OK!

(via burdge)

ethiopienne:

We Read Too is a book resource app created by Kaya Thomas (@kthomas901) that includes over 300 Children’s and YA books written by authors of color featuring characters of color. You can browse, search, view the details of every book as well as suggest any books that should be added in the app. This resource is for all people of color who have felt misrepresented or forgotten when finding books to read.

Help the app grow by downloading it for free here (
http://bit.ly/1mUfe2F), rating and reviewing the app, and suggesting new books & genres that should be included! Follow @WeReadTooApp on twitter and like Facebook page at facebook.com/WeReadTooApp for updates. 

(via yahighway)

wilwheaton:

prbuick11:

nichtsoweiss:

brokenheels-brokenheart:

Puppies in bow ties are just perfect

prbuick11 bloogue
HAVE YOU GUYS SEEN THIS PERFECTION?!?!

BUH BRENT LOOK!!

Ties (bow or neck) make even the cutest dog in the world 600000000 times cuter. #SCIENCE

winchesterson:

perplexingly:

geosaurus:

perplexingly:

Imagine dragons sleeping the same way giraffes do

image

Yessss! I wanna draw sleeping dragons tooo

Maybe they sleep like camels…image

or cats…

image

or…. uh… snakes?

image

Yeeeeaaaaah

Or maybe they sleep on trees

image

There is nothing about this post I don’t love

Oh tumblr, you’re the best. 

(via corinneduyvis)